A Tea-Kettle Could Take Down A Company… If It Really Wanted To!

You’re at work right now, and earlier when you were walking in you found an unknown expensive flash drive that says it holds 128 GB sitting in the parking lot.

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I know that you want to plug it in and see what is on it, and keep it since 128 GB is unreal to just find! But the question you need to ask yourself is: Should you?

It is common instinct to just plunk the drive into your work PC’s USB port and see what’s on it, but I honestly think you should just throw it in the trash and let everyone else in the office know to do the same.

Leave it a mystery, it’s better off to leave it that way than regret it later!

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You can pay thousands of dollars on network security, painstakingly plan out contingencies, have an IT guy on deck to take care of issues, but most of the time the weakest link in a business’ network can be the employees themselves.

The US Department of Homeland Security ran tests to see how hard it was for hackers to find a way to gain access into systems using the USB-drive-in-the-parking-lot-trick just to see what would happen.

Pretty obvious to not plug in an unknown USB Drive, right?

Sad to say… not really

During this test it was found that 60% of the flash drives that were found in the parking lot of a business were plugged into the company’s computers out of curiosity, and the number went up to ninety percent if the drive had the company’s name or logo printed on it!

Yes, you read that amount correctly: 90%! If you had a 90% chance of winning the lottery wouldn’t you take it? This is what a hacker sees with this type of scenario, this is why these stories need to be heard to show that vulnerabilities exist everywhere!

We can never be prepared for all scenarios, but it is possible to prevent them. We say this because when you purchase cybersecurity insurance for your business we want you to also know how to prevent anything that could and would be harmful to you or your clients. 

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Do you have an Amazon Alexa? Or a smart water-cooler for theoffice that you can always monitor flavor levels using an application on your phone? I suggest you identify if you really, really need it because the risks are great when using these devices in a business environment.

Because just as the title of this inaugural post suggests: Even a tea-kettle can lead to the downfall of your company!

Executives at Blackberry discovered a Wi-Fi enabled smart-tea kettle that was used to gain access to their network. Using this kettle, a hacker was able to reroute their internal email to an outside address and could see what was occurring within Blackberry since they had a copy of all of their internal emails!

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Ultimately, this was just an internal test done by the company themselves during a keynote presentation, but the sheer simplicity of the plan was amazing. They did this to show that this technique can be used on companies big and small. If someone were to compromise your network that your Point Of Sale system is on, it could spell bad news for your customers and ultimately your business!

According to McAfee Inc. it is estimated that the cybersecurity issue costs about a $1 trillion USD per year globally, and will continue to grow upward– a number we will always work to ensure that our clients do not contribute to. This is why we want all of our readers to know that you can be proactive yourselves and ensure that your business does not fall prey to hacking attempts!

With our dependency on technology, Cyber Liability Insurance is a must!

By Aaron Young

 

 

 

 

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About Aaron

Aaron Young is a published poet and business blogger. Graduated from New Mexico State University with a Bachelor’s Degree in English and the University of Texas at El Paso with a Master’s Degree in Business Administration.
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